E-Scrap Conference Kicks Off Today With Two ISRI Courses

REMINDER! ISRI will be offering two courses today taught be industry experts that will help electronic recyclers grow business. Starting at 8:00 a.m., ISRI Electronics Recycling Educational Program: “What’s New in R2 & RIOS,” will focus on the value of the R2 and RIOS certifications. This panel, which is comprised of recyclers that have gone through the certification processes, will give an inside look at the benefits of completing the R2:RIOS certification process. In addition, the panel will discuss the revisions to the standards, and how that will affect recyclers, as well as the importance of managing downstream.

Starting at 1:00 p.m., the course, ISRI Electronics Recycling Educational Program: How to Maximize Value in Reuse, is designed to help electronics recyclers exploit the reuse potential of used electronics equipment. Experts in reuse, refurbishment and resale will address a variety of opportunities to maximize value – including returns, repair, wireless devices, non-traditional equipment and components. Attendees will have the chance to learn from industry leaders who have built a profitable business in each of the key areas available to optimize the reuse market.

Both courses will be in the Celebration Room.

Please stop by booth #707 if you have any questions.

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Welcome to E-Scrap

With registration officially open, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) would like to welcome all 2013 E-Scrap attendees to Orlando! As with every E-Scrap Conference, ISRI will be hosting and participating in a number of activities that we encourage everyone to attend. New this year, ISRI will be publishing e-Scrap Beat, a daily electronic newsletter that will be distributed each morning of the conference offering feature stories, highlights of the previous day, and what to look for in the day ahead. We hope this proves to be a valuable resource to those in Orlando and those unable to attend.

During your stay at E-Scrap, please stop by booth 707 to meet with ISRI staff who are available to answer any questions and to assist you with any membership needs.

For live updates throughout the Conference, follow ISRI on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Join ISRI for the Welcoming Reception

ISRI is proud to be hosting this year’s Welcoming Reception, to be held Tuesday, September 10, in the Ballroom Commons (in the event of inclement weather the reception will be moved toE-Scrap Welcome Reception the International Ballroom). As part of the festivities, all attendees will be issued a “Golden Ticket,” good for a free spin on the trivia wheel at the RIOSTM booth, #709, with the opportunity for valuable prizes.

ISRI would like to thank the following sponsors: AERC Recycling Solutions; Electronic Recyclers International, Inc.; HiTech Assets, Inc.; MRP Company; Regency Technologies, and Wistron.

EPA Releases Updated FAQ on Cathode Ray Tubes

The EPA’s Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery is pleased to announce the release of an updated set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the existing cathode ray tube (CRT) regulation. This set of FAQs includes both new and updated questions that have been added to the original set of CRT FAQs that were released April 2013.   EPA first published the CRT FAQs to assist entities that collect, manage, and recycle used CRTs and CRT glass with understanding the federal regulations that apply to these materials.

Several specific updates include:

(1) What RCRA requirements apply to CRT panel glass (which generally does not fail TCLP), and

(2) What it means for a person to “show that the material is potentially recyclable and has a feasible means of being recycled” under the speculative accumulation provision.

For additional information about this FAQ and CRT recycling, please contact ISRI staff Eric Harris, director of government and international affairs,  at 202-662-8514 and David Wagger, director of environmental management, at 202-662-8533.

Workshop to Explore How R2 & RIOS Certifications Can Help Expand Business

On Tuesday morning a comprehensive discussion, ISRI Electronics Recycling Educational Program: “What’s New in R2 & RIOS,” will take place about the value of the R2 and RIOS certifications. This panel, which is comprised of recyclers that have gone through the certification processes and understand the immense value, will give an inside look at the benefits of completing the R2:RIOS certification process. In addition to highlighting the broader value, the panel will discuss the revisions to the standards, and how that will affect recyclers, as well as the importance of managing downstream.

This is a perfect opportunity to find out how to lower your bottom line, yield a significant return on investment, expand sales globally, and show customers that you are dedicated to health and safety, industry best practices, and global and environmental responsibility.

The program will take place tomorrow at 8 am in the Celebration Room. Separate registration is required. The fee is $125 for ISRI members and $150 for non-ISRI members. Attendees will be issued a “Golden Ticket,” good for a free spin on the trivia wheel at the RIOSTM booth, #709, with the opportunity for valuable prizes.

For more information, contact Darrell Kendall or stop by booth #709.

ISRI Course Focuses on Reuse Potential of UEPs

The course, ISRI Electronics Recycling Educational Program: How to Maximize Value in Reuse, is designed to help electronics recyclers exploit the reuse potential of used electronics equipment. Experts in reuse, refurbishment and resale will address a variety of opportunities to maximize value – including returns, repair, wireless devices, non-traditional equipment and components. Attendees will have the chance to learn from industry leaders who have built a profitable business in each of the key areas available to optimize the reuse market. This ISRI short course will include a handout book of all the presentations.

The program will take place, Tuesday, September 10, from 1:00 to 5:00 pm in the Celebration Room. Separate registration is required. The fee is $125 for ISRI members and $150 for non-ISRI members. Attendees will be issued a “Golden Ticket,” good for a free spin on the trivia wheel at the RIOSTM booth, #709, with the opportunity for valuable prizes.

For more information, contact Eric Harris or stop by booth #707.

 

ITC reports on US eScrap industry

Contrary to popular opinion, the U.S. electronics industry is not exporting broken or obsolete electronics products on a large scale, according to a study prepared by the U.S. International Trade Commission.

The study, available here found that about 17% percent of used electronic products are being exported from the U.S., a direct rebuttal of the widely-quoted myth that 80 percent of electronics collected for recycling in the U.S. are dumped overseas.

Andrea Boren of the U.S. ITC discussed the government’s findings at ISRI’s Convention  and Expo April 11.

“The reports that you’ve heard over the past few years citing 80 percent of electronics are exported and dumped into developing countries has no relationship to the facts that are in this report,” said John Powers of ISRI.

The report values the entire U.S. electronics recycling market at $20.65 billion.

Of the 17 percent percent of electronics exported by American companies, “Whole equipment for reuse accounted for the largest share of U.S. exports by value in 2011, and tested and working products represented the majority of U.S. exports of whole (Used Electronic Products),” according to the report.

Boren responded to criticism that the government agency may have been misled or the material under reported, saying the agency is confident the report prepared at the federal government’s request is the best information available.

“We were aware of the challenges (in preparing the study) from the onset, and the ITC has expertise in conducting these surveys of industry and we did not see any anomalies in our results,” Boren said.

ISRI’s Electronics Division, which met before the start of the convention, welcomed rhe findings of the report.

“We are quite pleased with the results of this finding,” said Eric Harris, Associate Counsel and Director of Government and International Affairs. “It the most comprehensive, exhaustive study to date on the export of used electronic products leaving the U.S. marketplace.”

For ISRI’s summary of the report, click here.

PA to enforce electronics disposal ban for residents

Later this month, Pennsylvanians will be required to stop disposing of their electronics in landfills and begin recycling instead. While manufacturers were required to start collecting and recycling e-scrap in 2012, the disposal ban didn’t go into place this year.

Landfill bans are amongst the most effective way to increase recycling of electronic scrap. The Pennsylvania law covers the most commonly recycled electronics: TVs, monitors, computers and accessories.

To date, 30 recyclers have been issued permits to recycle and prepare for reuse electronics through the state program. On the state website,  companies and residents seeking an electronics recycling firm can see pertinent information about recyclers approved through the state program, including EPA permitting information, the types of materials the recyclers handle and how the materials are handled (recycled, reuse, refurbish, brokered, etc.) and if the recycler regularly audits end-use markets for the materials they recycle.

Knowing how an electronics recycler intends to handle the electronic scrap products they produces is very, very important. Coupled with a strong environmental certification – such as R2/RIOS ™ – businesses and residents can be assured their electronics are being handled in an ethical, environmentally safe way that places a premium on data security and reuse.

For more on the state’s electronics recycling laws, click HERE.

For a list of R2 (Responsible Recycling) certified companies, click HERE.

More Canadians covered by electronics recycling laws

Nearly all of Canada will be covered by some form of electronics recycling mandate as new Extended Producer Responsibility legislation comes online in Newfoundland and Labrador.

The new government plan calls for electronics manufacturers with market presence within the province to develop recycling plans for their products within 120 days. These plans will be examined by the provincial governments’ Multi-Materials Stewardship Board.  The new legislative scheme was authorized under amendments to Labrador and Newfoundland’s existing Waste Management Regulations under the Environmental Protection Act.

“Newfoundlanders and Labradorians have been looking forward to the introduction of an e-waste recycling program and we are happy to introduce these changes to the regulations,” said Leigh Puddester, Chair and Chief Executive Officer of the MMSB. “We have been working closely with electronics manufacturers to see them take a leadership role in handling the end-of-life treatment of their products. By having producers take this responsibility, they will increasingly think about ways to redesign their products to be more environmentally friendly and easier to recycle.”

The government estimates that each year, provincial households generate 1,551 tons of recyclable electronics and the institutional, commercial and industrial sector generates 1,055 tons.

With the announcement, made earlier this month, only four provinces in Canada do not have electronics recycling mandates: Yukon, Nunavut, the Northwest Territories and New Brunswick. With more than 750,000 residents, New Brunswick is the most populous of these; the other three territories, located in the sparsely settled northern regions, have less than 50,000 residents each.

For more information on changes to the Waste Management Regulations can be found at www.assembly.nl.ca or www.mmsb.nl.ca.

Wisconsin residents turning on to e-cycling

Wisconsin’s E-Cycle program, the state-wide electronics recycling program, is now in its third year and is gaining traction and recognition amongst state residents.

Each year, the state Department of Natural Resources conducts a statewide survey of residents to help determine the effectiveness of the program and the overall awareness of the program within the state.

Comparing the survey results reported in September 2012 with those from similar surveys reported in 2011 and 2012, the state DNR says that two-thirds of state residents are now aware of the law passed in October 2009 banning electronics from state landfills, and that 40 percent of all residents had some knowledge of the state electronics collection and recycling program, Wisconsin E-Cycle.

The survey showed that Wisconsonians are most vigilant about recycling their TV sets – from nearly 30 percent who said they put their old TV sets out to the curb in 2006, about 6 percent said they did so in 2011, with nearly 40 percent saying they recycled their TVs in 2011.

The survey did reveal some gaps in awareness of the landfill ban, especially amongst younger residents (Ages 18-30) and in certain regions of the state. Residents in rural areas were more familiar with the landfill ban than their urban neighbors.

While expense – or perceived expense, as the survey points out – is the number one reason most people say they don’t recycle their electronics more often, the second most common reason was not knowing where or how to recycle their electronics.

What can state regulators take from this survey? It’s interesting that online methods of awareness of the program were the least cited in the survey – only 5 to 15 percent of residents learned of the program through the internet, compared with news stories (70 percent amongst seniors, 60 percent amongst other groups). The group with the lowest awareness – 18-30 year olds – had the highest online exposure rate at just more than 15 percent.

The 18-30 year old tech generation is likely to rate the Internet as important as air, food and water, studies show – so it’s important to target these groups using the media that work for them. WDNR doesn’t feel that the internet is a strong vehicle for their message, however.

“The combination of tools we have been using to conduct outreach has made an impact on survey respondents. Clearly, news stories, communities, radio ads, waste haulers and retailers all play important roles in reaching Wisconsin residents. However, if E-Cycle Wisconsin would like to particularly target younger residents in upcoming years, electronics retailers may hold the key to doing so,” the agency states in the report.

To view the full report, click here.